Kurashiki – Exploring the Old Bikan Quarter

An afternoon stroll through the historical quarter of Kurashiki.

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After spending half the day in Okayama we were off to visit the old historical part of Kurashiki. Straight out of the car park we found ourselves in the streets of the historic quarter, called Bikan.

Kurashiki Achi shrine stairs

Kurashiki Achi shrine main gate

kurashiki achi shrine monk

Kurashiki achi shrine monk

Kurashiki Achi shrine view

Before going deeper into the old part we climbed the steep hill to the Achi-jinja shrine on top of Mount Tsurugata, a shrine which overlooks the town and offers some great views. The shrine was originally designated to worship the patron of Kurashiki and nowadays people come here to worship the gods for traffic, fortune and arts.

Kurashiki Achi shrine chinese zodiac clock

We found the Chinese zodiac dial, which can be seen in one of the buildings, most interesting and unique. We could not work out it’s meaning and unfortunately there was no description anywhere to be seen. Leaving the shrine through the northern entrance gate, we walked down a winding path reaching the main shopping area of Kurashiki.

Kurashiki ohashi house lantern

Kurashiki Ohashi house main entrance architecture

Heading to the left we strolled on to the beautifully restored Ohashi house, which lies between the station and the Bikan area. It was built in 1793 and belonged to one of the richest families of Kurashiki. The owners used to be a prosperous merchant family and they claimed privileges, which had previously only been granted to samurais. The house luckily survived World War II and the structure was built of wood and clay as Japanese houses traditionally used to be. For a small entrance fee you enter through a small courtyard into the main building.

Kurashiki Ohashi house main entrance noren

Inside the main building you find the kitchen and storage room and you will be asked to take off your shoes in order to walk through the tatami floored rooms. The thing that has always amazed me about Japanese houses are the many little court yards you find when walking through the buildings.

Kurashiki Ohashi house courtyard architecture

Kurashiki ohashi house chozubachis

My favourite courtyard in the Ohashi house had a granite stone water basins, called a chozubachis, lush ferns, moss and other plants. The courtyards are a calm place to sit down on the wooden hallways and relax.

Kurashiki Ohashi house architecture tatami room

Kurashiki ohashi house engawa

The wooden hallways surrounding traditional Japanese houses are known as Engawa, which traditionally enclosed most of the Japanese houses, used as room connections and to let in light and air and in the hot summer months. It is rare to see houses of such overwhelming beauty and we definitely recommend making a little the detour to visit the Ohashi house.

Kurashiki vending machine

Kurashiki bikan quarter catslot machine

Kurashiki bikan quarter ice cream kakigori

Finding our way back to the Bikan quarter we passed lots of shops, cafes, restaurants and museums. One of the first shops we passed was a cat shop. Just by the entrance door we found a cat slot machine, where Jerome tried his luck and actually won a tiny cat after his second go. He probably thought that was 200Yen well spent.

Bikan quarter willow canal

kurashiki bikan quarter tourist

kurashiki bikan quarter canal local kids

We walked deeper into the Bikan quarter, where the main attraction is the willow-edged canal surrounded by picturesque black and white warehouses.

kurashiki bikan quarter canal houses architecture

kurashiki bikan quarter canal houses architecture

kurashiki bikan quarter wooden houses architecture

In the feudal era these warehouses were used to store rice. It was very pleasant to stroll, visiting the small shops and watching the boats with their passengers slowly floating up and down the canal.

kurashiki bikan quarter bridge tourists

kurashiki bikan quarter canal boat ride

kurashiki bikan quarter canal willow trees

A 20 minutes ride in one of the traditional boats costs 500Yen for adults and 250Yen for children and tickets can be bought at the tourist information. We skipped the boat ride and the museums as it was getting late and most shops and museums were closing at 5pm.

kurashiki bikan quarter side street shop

kurashiki bikan quarter side street architecture

kurashiki bikan quarter restaurant

kurashiki bikan quarter canal houses architecture

kurashiki bikan quarter dog statue shop

In one of the side streets we found a boutique selling only one thing, colourful locally made tapes using Japanese washi paper.

kurashiki bikan quarter shopping washi paper

We spent a long time choosing which ones we wanted to buy as gifts for friends and family. There were too many different designs to choose from. Afterwards we had dinner in a small local restaurant chosen at random, and then drove back to Bingoya.

Author: wanderlustplusone

I am Vanessa, a Frankfurter living in London with my husband Chris and our son Jerome. We love exploring all the weird and wonderful places the world has on offer. Travelling with children is exciting, sometimes stressful but always worth it. I want to show that weekends away and longer holidays don't have to be boring but a lot of fun. If you are looking for getaways with kids clubs then you are unfortunately looking at the wrong blog but if you are up for adventures I would love to give you ideas. I hope you will enjoy and never stop going away to unknown places...

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