Lamma Island, Hong Kong | A Hike along the Island’s Family Trail

The first part of our walk across Lamma, through a charming little fisher village and with amazing views across the island and the Chinese Sea.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu village

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A hike on the Lamma Island Family Trail had been high on our list of things to redo during our stay in Hong Kong. We remembered walking the popular route last time and had especially liked the mixture of charming villages on either side of the island with a stop on the beach in between away from the traffic of the main city. We went to the Central ferry terminal straight after breakfast for the short boat ride to the island. We had packed some snacks and water and very important, our swimming stuff into our backpack to take along. Many tourists do not venture outside of the main Hong Kong and Kowloon areas but visiting the other islands and districts gives a very rewarding experience and I can certainly recommend finding the time for that if you are there.

The walking tour can be started either by taking the ferry to Yung Shue Wan or Sok Kwu Wan village. We did the latter, the time before we had taken the walk from the other end of the island. We decided to start at this end of the island, as the ferries from Yung Shue Wan were more frequent. Having boarded our ferry at pier number 4, we chose seats on the deck outside, to get some fresh air and enjoy a window less view during our ride. There were a number of other hikers and a few locals with us on the boat when we left the pier. The skyline of both Hong Kong Island and Kowloon was still shrouded in misty clouds as we chugged out of the docks, but we could see that further away from the city the sky was blue and the sun was shining, another benefit of escaping the high rises in the centre. We admired the soaring buildings and tower blocks from afar, with “The Peak” rising up behind and Jerome took a special interest in the passing boats.

travel hong kong with kids children central ferry pier

travel hong kong with kids children central ferry pier view kowloon

travel hong kong with kids children victoria bay ferry ride

travel hong kong with kids children central skyline view

travel hong kong with kids children first ferry watching

On the way out of the main harbour we spotted the Star Ferries, some junks sailing up and down the harbour and the fast ferries to Macao, lifted up in the air, overtaking us at superfast speed. There also were some car ferries, laden with trucks and huge container ships waiting to enter the massive container port at Kowloon. After a short while we left Victoria Harbour and the bay of Hong Kong behind and were out at sea where we could see some of the outlying islands on the horizon. Lamma Island can easily be recognised by the three tall power station chimneystacks towering over the islands hilly landscape. After sailing past a lush, green hill with a winding road the outskirts of Aberdeen were visible to our left. Ocean Park came into sight, where we had spent some fun times on the crazy rides a few days before.

travel hong kong with kids children fast ferry macao

travel hong kong with kids children car ferry mamma island

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu fisherfolk village

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu fisher boats

Shortly after the boat turned into Picnic Bay. We could see the stilt houses of Sok Kwu Wan village and the fishing rafts of the Lamma Fisher Folk ahead of us. After exiting the ferry we walked past the many restaurants that are raised over the water here and make the village a popular food destination. I particularly liked the row of restaurant with their checked tablecloths and plastic flowers but we have yet to have the chance to enjoy lunch or dinner there.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu restaurant

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu restaurant terrace

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu restaurant chefs recommendation

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu early lunch

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu dried mushrooms

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu restaurant menu

After a short walk through the village we soon had come to the end of the small settlement and reached Tin Hau temple, which dates back to 1826.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu tin hau temple

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu advertising

Once outside the village we got a better view of the Fisher Village on floating rafts in the bay. Sadly the number of traditional fisherman in Hong Kong has been on the decline for years now but here at Sok Kwu the community has set up a new concept to attract tourists and therefore help to support the local fisherman and their families. Unfortunately the set up for the Fisherfolk Village was not yet finished during our stay but I am sure it would make a great addition to the Family Trail on Lamma Island to learn more about the history and daily life of the people here on these floating rafts.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu fisherman

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu fisherman rafts

We crossed a little bridge, with residential houses on either side and walked along the trail next to the shoreline. Jerome had remembered the caves and soon enough we could see the dark entrance to one of them. These caves, also called “Kamikaze” caves date back to WWII. Jerome and I ventured into one of them and were slightly disappointed to find they looked just like any ordinary cave, dark and damp. They were built by the Japanese occupying forces and were supposed to house motorboats loaded with explosives to disrupt allied shipping during the war, however, these were never used. From here on the path slightly inclines and passes a modern pavilion next to a rubbish-strewn beach. This is one thing we noticed during our entire stay again and again in Hong Kong in different places that rubbish would just be left everywhere.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu architecture

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu flowers

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu local architecture

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu kamikaze cave

Higher up we strolled through the small settlement of Lo So Shing, consisting of a few houses and some locals working in their fruit and vegetable gardens.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island lo so shing village

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island lo so shing village farm

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island lo so shing village field

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island lo so shing village shop

The higher we got the better the view of the bay, with the many boats and rafts and the houses below. Once we had reached the highest point of the trail we finally got a view of the chimneystacks poking out behind the hills and with the outline of Cheung Chau, one of the many other islands in the calm waters of the South Chinese Sea. We could also see a deserted beach, which is accessible from the path by a longer detour but as we had not brought a full picnic and lots of drinks with us we gave it a miss.

We walked a bit further and found a quiet spot where we had a break and ate some of the dried mango and refreshing water from our knapsack looking at the view.  Perhaps we should have waited slightly longer before resting, because as we turned a corner and reached a Chinese style pavilion, there was a lady with her cart, selling fresh pineapple and coconuts in the middle of no where. We bought a fresh coconut and an ice-lolly for Jerome.

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island sok kwu village view

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island lo so shing village view

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island landscape

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island hung shing yeh beach

travel hong kong with kids children lamma island chinese pavilion

Part two will follow very soon, I decided to divide the post into two parts, as I had too many photos…

Author: wanderlustplusone

I am Vanessa, a Frankfurter living in London with my husband Chris and our son Jerome. We love exploring all the weird and wonderful places the world has on offer. Travelling with children is exciting, sometimes stressful but always worth it. I want to show that weekends away and longer holidays don't have to be boring but a lot of fun. If you are looking for getaways with kids clubs then you are unfortunately looking at the wrong blog but if you are up for adventures I would love to give you ideas. I hope you will enjoy and never stop going away to unknown places...

17 thoughts on “Lamma Island, Hong Kong | A Hike along the Island’s Family Trail”

  1. Very beautiful place!! When I was in hong kong, I did not manage to visit Lamma island but next time I have to go 😉 have u visited Saikung? A place as beautiful as lamma island :3

    1. No sadly we didn’t. I had it on my list as I really liked the idea of the waterfall and the deserted beaches. The weather wasn’t that warm and sunny on the other days and being on Hong Kong side made it slightly more difficult to get there. We’ll definitely try to venture there on our next visit.

      1. Yeah I understand, it is not much worth it if the weather is bad 😦 you do not grasp ths real beauty of the place! Next time if u have the chance, have a look, it is a beautiful place 😉

  2. Great summary of a walk I did many years ago now. Sadly (problem my end) I could not get your pictures to open – I would love to see how it has changed in the past maybe 15 years.

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